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Death, Sex & Money's Financial Therapy

Death, Sex & Money's Financial Therapy

Loading... Many of you are in financial transition right now. You've lost jobs, income, stable housing. And you're worried about what's to come. For many of us, this time of uncertainty isn't just bringing up thoughts about financial survival. It's also making us question our values, our identities and our plans for the future.  All of that can be difficult to process, especially as we're in isolation. So we're calling on an expert for help: financial therapist Amanda Clayman. For the next several weeks, Amanda's going to be talking with some of you about those issues that are surfacing around money in your lives—and helping you process them and figure out a path forward.  Listen to the episodes below, starting May 18.    Intro: Financial Therapy: Meet Amanda Clayman Amanda Clayman is a licensed clinical social worker who decided to become a therapist after her own money issues started to cause disruption in her life. "I was just bringing a lot of emotional baggage, and family baggage to how I was relating to money," she told me. "What I have come to feel very deeply...is that...all financial behavior has meaning." Amanda and I talk about how she's approaching her clients' financial anxieties and issues during the pandemic, and why it's important to not just problem solve, but also examine the meaning of financial loss in your life.     Find out more here.   Episode 1: Financial Therapy: What Is Our Savings For?   Before the pandemic, Dale ran an event space in Knoxville, Tennessee. After cancelling every booking this month—which was set to be their busiest ever—she finds herself wondering how to share the burden of her financial anxiety with her husband—and how to square the fact that after years of hustling to make her business a reality, she's really enjoying having some time alone. Find out more here.   Episode 2: Financial Therapy: Why Did I Take That Risk?   Two years ago, Mathew* quit an executive job and struck out on his own to start an independent consulting firm. After months of bringing in "90% less than what [he] used to," business was finally starting to pick up earlier this year—and then the pandemic hit. With clients pulling contracts and invoices being paid late, Mathew is back to square one, wondering if the risks he took were worth it as his family deals with the consequences of his decision—and whether the need for emotional control that served him so well in his business career is still the right strategy for this crisis. *Name changed   Episode 3: Financial Therapy: How Much Should I Help My Family? Right now, Frenchie is feeling secure in her job as an administrator at a Texas college. But that's not the case for her dad and her three sisters. They're all experiencing various levels of financial fallout from COVID—and as she thinks back on past family crises and the ways she stepped in to help, Frenchie wonders if she'll find herself gravitating towards a familiar support role in this moment, and how sustainable that would be. "Because I also ask if something happens to me, is anybody going to be able to support me?" she tells Amanda. "And right now, I feel like the answer is no."  We want your feedback on this special series! Tell us what you thought at deathsexmoney.org/ftsurvey. Stay in touch with us! Sign up for our newsletter and we'll keep you up to date about what's happening behind the scenes at Death, Sex & Money. Plus, we'll send you audio recommendations, letters from our inbox and a note from Anna. Join the Death, Sex & Money community and subscribe today.

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